Federation of Old Cornwall Societies

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Cury & Gunwalloe Old Cornwall Society

Officers

 

Chairman: Priscilla Oates, I Colvennor Cottages, Cury TR12 7BJ, 01326240887

 

Secretary:  Stephanie Shaw,   01326 560480

 

Treasurer: Laurence Garner, The Stable. Merries Barnes, Cury TR12 7RA, 01326 241356

 

Membership Secretary:  Penelope Oates, Oaklands, Cury TR12 7BH, 01326 240654

 

Recorder Team Co-ordinator:  Priscilla Oates, 01326 240887

 

 

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Founded: 2018

 

Programme

 

We meet on the second Thursday of every month during the year at Cury Village Hall,

White Cross, Cury. TR12 7BH.

 

Reports

 

Twelve members of Cury & Gunwalloe with Friends from Mullion Old Cornwall Society attended the Winter Festival of Old Cornwall Societies at Torpoint Community College on Saturday where the Torpoint Old Cornwall Society were the hosts for the day.

After a leisurely morning looking around the various displays of Cornish Memorabilia etc., we were ready for a delicious hot pasty lunch before the afternoon festivities began with the Town Crier of Torpoint declaring the event open, with a wonderful display of banners from all over the County. We were then welcomed by the Mayor of Torpoint, Cllr. Mrs. Christine Goodman and the President of Torpoint OCS Sir. Richard Carew Pole.and the President of Federation of Old Cornwall Societies, Mrs. K Easton.

Cury & Gunwalloe had a good attendance for the customary roll of societies, after which Mrs. Rosemary Pellew (who was a Cury girl and after marrying Rodney from Mullion went to live in Torpoint when Rodney was in the Navy) gave a most interesting presentation on the history of Torpoint. Following the presentation Moe Keast entertained with her dialect stories and Ilow Gwavow played some wonderful music on the bagpipes, and other musical instruments.

A break for a cuppa tea and a saffron bun and we were off again with Torpoint Silver Band playing some hymn tunes and other well known songs and finishing with the fantastic Flora Dance to get our feet tapping. Finally Celtic Reflections again sang good old favourite Cornish songs together with Hail to the Homeland the first verse being sung in Cornish and everyone joining in and during the final parade of banners Trelawney was sung thus ending a very busy and enjoyable day. Thank you to Torpoint for all the hard work put in organising such an event..

 

At the January meeting of Cury & Gunwalloe Old Cornwall Society Members were dressed up warm ready to take their drink and a piece of toast to a nearby orchard where they carried out the Wassail; on the apple trees. The toast was for the robins and the drink (whatever it was) was thrown against the tree to help fertility.

 

Returning to the Village Hall there was a nice warming cup of tea ready after which Glen Humphreys gave a presentation on Cornish apples and told us which ones were best for eating, cooking and cider making.

 

We will be doing a project on apple orchards in our area and recording where they are and the type of apple grown.

 

There is no meeting in February as we are having our dinner; our next meeting will be from 7.00pm Thursday, 14th March at 7.30p.m at Cury Village Hall.

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Why Cury and Gunwalloe Old Cornwall Society?

 

Cury and Gunwalloe are two adjoining Villages on the west side of The Lizard Penisula. Both are rural Villages with the nearest Town being Helston. They are reached by minor roads leading off in a south westerly direction from the main Helston to Lizard Road, after it passes R.N.A.S. Culdrose.

Gunwalloe is perhaps best known for its Church on the beach, with its detached Bell Tower built into the cliff face.  More recently, episodes of “Poldark” were filmed here. In times past Gunwalloe had its own Pilchard fishing industry, at Fishing Cove, perhaps the least well known of its three coves. Inland and adjoining Cury the land was mainly 0f mixed farming.

Cury has always been an agricultural parish, although these days the fields are more likely to be growing Daffodils or Cauliflower (still known locally as “brockla”), than full of grazing herds of Channel Island Cattle. Cury also played its part in the Pray Book Rebellion.

Both Villages get a mention in The Domesday Book of1086. Gunwalloe with its large Manor of Winniation (locally called Gwynyon), held by The King. While Cury boasted the three smaller manors of Bochym, Polwyn and Skewes.

Both Villages have archaeological evidence dating back to settlements being here in The Bronze Age, and possibly earlier.

Cury and Gunwalloe have always made up the Ecclesiastical Parish of Cury with Gunwalloe. Cury being dedicated to St,Corentyn and Gunwalloe to St, Winwalloe.  There is a list of the names of the Priests for the Parish, in Cury Church, listing their names from 1219 to the present day. This shows that in 1219 the Priest for Cury with Gunwalloe and Breage, was William Fitzhumphry.

How did He get to Breage? A long journey by land or across the bay towards Porthleven?

The Children from Gunwalloe have always and still  do attend  Cury Church of England School. Cury having started with a Dame School before Education Acts provided a more formal education system.

The present resident population of Cury is just over 400, and Gunwalloe is just under half that number.

Therefore:

When it was decided to open an Old Cornwall Society, it made sense to us to include both Village names in the title of our Old Cornwall Society.

Q. E. D.

St Corentyn's Church

St Corentyn's Chuch

Cury & Gunwalloe

"Keep walking girls, there's one of those Old Cornwall Recorders trying to hide behind that gate!"